Editor’s Commentary: The entry below was originally published by Harvey Day for DailyMail.com on 18 October 2017. There are a few things of note to point out about this surprising article – surprising because, as Day himself wrote, this is ‘a little remembered part of history today,’ and surprising because we now live in a time in the West when emphasis of non-White misfortunes in history are emphasized to an extreme and White misfortunes are hardly, if ever, mentioned. This is particularly true when considering the sufferings of the German People.

One should note the semantics used in the narrative. The large scale prisons in which the German Americans were interred as ‘alien-enemies’ are not referred to as ‘concentration camps’ – they are, more appropriately, called ‘internment camps’. It is easy to doubt that the use of this term is used in this article merely for accuracy. The term ‘concentration camp’ must always and forever only be used in reference to the ‘holocaust’ religion and no other – to use it in reference to a crime against the German People would result in howls from that myth’s high-priests.

The fact is that internment camps weren’t an invention by National Socialist Germany. One could note the camps used by the American government to imprison the Navajos in the 19th century, the horrid use by the Spanish in Cuba during the Ten Years War (1868-1878), as well as the Boer War in South Africa (1899-1902). The later stands out for it particular cruelty. While the British government sent most of the White Boer Men to prisons overseas, the ‘camps’ were used to imprison primarily women and children – approximately 22,000 Boer Children and over 4,000 Boer Women died from poisonings and starvation in these ‘camps’. The females were raped by their captors regardless of their age. In all, an estimated 28,000 total succumbed to the depraved conditions of these outdoor prisons. The mastermind of these ‘camps’ was none other than Winston Churchill. The site, German Victims – Deutsche Opfer, has published a thoroughly researched expose on this atrocity, below are a few relevant points:

There is a way to break the resistance [referring to the White Boer men defending themselves against the British robbery, rape, and murder invasion]… We have to kill them in order to teach their children to love us. – Winston Churchill

Before the winter of 1902, the Boers surrendered because of the deadly conditions in the concentration camps to prevent further dying of the families. 26,251 women and children died in the camps. With the old men it was 28,000. 22,000 of the dead were under 16 years old. The dead in the camps represented 10% of the Boer population.

Source: Compiled and translated by Teutonicaworld from writings by Claus Nordbruch, South Africa

By admin: The Boers are of primarily German decent and include Dutch and French settlers from the Netherland region. Their German ancestry has been hidden and denied since after WWII by history falsifiers and for political benefits. It is common practice to hide the true stories of the German people in all media, including on the internet and in YouTube videos by providing falsified information; and so it is with the story of the Boers. This is part of the plan by the enemy to annihilate the importance of the German nation in all of the world’s history and with it the Germans themselves. That the Boers were primarily Germans, and that the great and brave president of the Boer nation was a German, Ohm Krueger, that is usually left out.

Source: Metapedia

Deutsche Opfer’s expose contextualizes this atrocity in contemporary relevance by illustrating the horrors that the descendants of this crime now face in South Africa. Heinous murders, rapes, land grabs, and overall acts of genocide are perpetrated daily against the White South Africans – with not a peep of protest from the rest of the world, most shamelessly from the Western governments who claim to be the champions against such horrors.

When Adolf Hitler was confronted with criticism regarding the use of internment camps he was quick to note that Germany did not invent the idea and pointed to the British camps in South Africa, noting their atrocious nature. He made it clear that the German camps were used to contain the inner enemy in Germany which sought to sabotage the liberation and rebuilding of Germany after its decimation from WWI. His primary point being that the German use of this historical political tool was as a form of containment of an inner political foe which actively worked to undermine the National Will. That cannot be said of Churchill’s use of the internment idea. Of course, as with everything post-WWII, the victors wrote their version of ‘history’ with none to challenge their versions of ‘truth’ until more recent years. But that is a topic for another discussion.

Harvey Day’s presentation of the persecution and internment of German Americans before, during, and after WWI shows a few interesting facts.

First, it shows the dignity and honor of these Men who were so unjustly tortured and criminalized by the non-Germans via the instigation by the government itself. One cannot but be touched by their ingenious use of recycled tobacco tins to build the church in Hot Springs, as well as the construction of the small German-syle village. These Men went to work to make the best out of their predicament with Spirit and Honor.

Second is the fact that the American government stole a half a billion dollars of German private property from these innocents. That figure is actually based on 1919 values – that’s an equivalent to over $7 billion dollars today. You don’t see the descendants of these German victims demanding ‘reparations’ for the injustice perpetrated against their ancestors. Such a thing was considered beneath the Dignity of a proud People.

Third, and most importantly to our time, was the assault against German Culture. The language, the literature, the changing of the names of cities, streets, parks, and schools – this is what we are seeing in the United States today with the sanction of the government, except it isn’t just the Germans – it is the whole of White history and Culture in America.

This is the most profound meaning of the following article. This is the future of White America if the People do not begin to take a stand against this onslaught of hate that is being perpetrated upon White Americans and Their Culture. Today it is physical assaults upon outnumbered Whites by government sanctioned groups like ANTIFA and BLM, it’s the removal of statues of historical personages and the renaming of cities, streets, parks, and schools, it’s the removal of Classic Western literature from schools, libraries, bookstores, and even now on the internet. Tomorrow it will be the internment of any White American who is labelled as a ‘nazi’ or a ‘hater’ who dares stand up for his or her right to exist, then it will be the internment of any White merely because of his or her Racial Heritage.

It was the government that called for this unjust persecution and victimization of the German Americans in 1913. It was the government that allowed the hideous violence against German Americans by the incited mobs before and during WWI. Today the government participates in the current hatefest against White Culture just as surely as the government of 1913 and on – the only difference is that the government is now firmly in the control of alien elements that seek the demise of all the Culture Bearers of the West en total.

This is the warning that cannot be ignored.


A fascinating collection of photos have resurfaced showing the hardships faced by German-Americans at the brutal height of the First World War.

As Europe was ravaged by fighting, German immigrants in the US suffered harassment, internment, lynchings – and even the humiliation of being tarred and feathered.

Although a little-remembered part of history today, America was wracked by the fear and paranoia that swept from coast to coast during the Great War.

The United States declared war on Germany in April 1917 and helped lead the Allies to victory. But before that, many Americans were terrified of the German threat growing on the other side of the world.

This collection of pictures reveals the full extent of war hysteria and open hostility towards all things German that erupted across the nation.

Tarred and Feathered
Pictured, German-American farmer John Meints, from Luverne, Minnesota, after being attacked, tarred and feathered by a group of masked men because he was accused of failing to buy war bonds in August 19, 1918
As Europe was ravaged by fighting, German immigrants in the US suffered harassment, internment, lynchings – and even the humiliation of being tarred and feathered. Pictured, the dormitory inside a German-American internment camp at Fort Douglas, Utah
Although a little-remembered part of history today, America was wracked by the fear and paranoia that swept from coast to coast during the Great War. Pictured, a crowd gathers for a German-language book burning at Baraboo High School in Wisconsin in 1918
The United States declared war on Germany in April 1917 and helped lead the Allies to victory. But before that, many Americans were terrified of the German threat growing on the other side of the world. Pictured, interned Germans forced to build the barracks for their own internment camp.

Before the war broke out, America had welcomed German immigrants and regarded them highly. German was the second most widely spoken language in the country and there were over 100 million first and second-generation German-Americans living in the United States, with many of them involved in the thousands of German organizations across the country.

The United States embraced them and the German language became an established part of the high school curriculum.

But when the war broke out and Germany became the enemy of the Allies abroad, the American government began calling on its people to reject their German-American neighbors.

President Woodrow Wilson declared that German-Americans were to be treated as ‘alien-enemies’ and that they should reject their German identity if they were to be accepted in US society.

This collection of pictures reveals the full extent of war hysteria and open hostility towards all things German that erupted across the nation. Pictured, German prisoners put to work gardening and harvesting food in Oglethorpe, Georgia on February 8, 1918
Before the war broke out, America had welcomed German immigrants and regarded them highly. Pictured, German prisoners holding their tools while posing for a photograph in Hot Springs, North Carolina, in 1917
German was the second most widely spoken language in the country and there were over 100 million first and second-generation German-Americans living in the United States. Pictured, the burnt ashes of Baraboo High School’s German books. Above the ashes are written the words: ‘Here lies the remains of German in B.H.S’
When the war broke out and Germany became the enemy of the Allies abroad, the American government began calling on its people to reject their German-American neighbors. Pictured, German-Americans, shortly after being freed from their internment camps, line up for a train in Hoboken, New Jersey, on September 25, 1919

This change in public opinion was immediate.

Literature began to directly attack German-American churches, schools, societies, and newspapers as agents of Imperial German conspiracy.

Thousands lost their jobs and countless more stopped speaking German. Fourteen states banned schools from teaching the language, declaring that German was ‘not a fit language to teach clean and pure American boys and girls.’

The American Defense Society, an off-shoot of the National Security League, encouraged the public burning of German-language books and campaigned to change the names of cities, streets, parks, and schools in America to the names of Belgian and French communities destroyed in the war.

Some Germans even saw their property seized by authorities – in total, the US confiscated half a billion dollars in private property during WWI.

The names of German food were removed from restaurant menus; sauerkraut became ‘liberty cabbage’, hamburger became ‘liberty steak’.

Even German Daschund dogs became known as ‘liberty dogs’ and German measles became ‘liberty measles’.

Harassment of German-Americans became commonplace. Employers would receive telephone calls asking if they still had ‘that German spy’ on the payroll.

Just having a German name was cause enough for the American Protective League to launch an investigation into a person’s private affairs.

A mob in Illinois lynched a man named Robert Prager (left) in April 1918 because they were convinced he was a German spy. Pictured right, a German-American knitting a scarf at a camp in Fort Douglas, Utah
President Woodrow Wilson declared that German-Americans were to be treated as ‘alien-enemies’ and that they should reject their German identity if they were to be accepted in US society. Pictured, German-Americans peer out the back of the train in Hoboken, New Jersey, on September 25, 1919
Fourteen states banned schools from teaching the language, declaring that German was ‘not a fit language to teach clean and pure American boys and girls.’ Pictured, the barracks inside the German internment camp in Hot Springs, North Carolina, in 1917
German-owned ships were captured by the American government after the US entered the war. In total, 54 merchant vessels were taken in and 1,800 sailors were sent to internment camps
The American Defense Society, an off-shoot of the National Security League, encouraged the public burning of German-language books and campaigned to change the names of cities, streets, parks, and schools in America to the names of Belgian and French communities destroyed in the war. Pictured, German-Americans inmates built a German-style village for themselves in Hot Springs, North Carolina, in 1917.
Some Germans even saw their property seized by authorities – in total, the US confiscated half a billion dollars in private property during WWI. Pictured, a view of the German-American village set up inside of the internment camp at Hot Springs
Harassment of German-Americans became commonplace. Employers would receive telephone calls asking if they still had ‘that German spy’ on the payroll. Pictured, a small wooden house built by inmates at Hot Springs
Inmates at Hot Springs used recycled tobacco tins to build the church (left). The names of German food were removed from restaurant menus; sauerkraut became ‘liberty cabbage’, hamburger became ‘liberty steak’. Even German Daschund dogs became known as ‘liberty dogs’

Worse yet, violence broke out – violence egged on by the government. Persons reading German-language newspapers on public trains were verbally insulted and spat on. A mob in Minnesota, for example, tarred and feathered a German-American man named John Meints in August 1918 on the grounds that he hadn’t bought war bonds. And another mob in Illinois lynched a man named Robert Prager in April 1918 because they were convinced he was a German spy.

While some German-Americans were attacked, around 6,000 were sent to internment camps. The government barred all German-Americans from living near military facilities, airports, port towns, or the capitol. And it forced every German-American to get fingerprinted and registered and sent them into camps across the country, locked in like prisoners of war.

Even when the fighting ended in late 1918, many weren’t sent free. Some inmates remained incarcerated until 1920.

Just having a German name was cause enough for the American Protective League to launch an investigation into a person’s private affairs. Pictured, children are stopped on their way to the park by a sign that reads: ‘DANGER!! To Pro-Germans — Loyal Americans Welcome to Edison Park,’ in Chicago, Illinois, in 1917
Worse yet, violence broke out – violence egged on by the government. Persons reading German-language newspapers on public trains were verbally insulted and spat on. Pictured, German-Americans at a train station in Hoboken, New Jersey, on September 25, 1919
These men are actually German soldiers. In a strange story, they ended up staying in America by choice, afraid that they would be destroyed by the British Navy if they returned to Europe. They were ultimately sent into internment camps along with the German-Americans in Portsmouth, Virginia, in 1916
While some German-Americans were attacked, around 6,000 were sent to internment camps. Pictured, the inside of a barracks at Hot Springs, North Carolina